How to Convert PEM Certificates to PFX Format

Sometimes a certificate is needed for demo or test purposes and there are several web sites which provide these for free. One of these sites is SSLforFree. When you let this site create all files for you (as opposed to providing a CSR) you will be provided with three files:

  1. Private.key. As the name implies this is the private key of the assymetric key pair. Never share this key for any other reason than importing it at the host you want to enable SSL on.
  2. Certificate.crt. This is the CA-signed public key.
  3. Ca_bundle.crt. This is the complete certificate chain to enable subjects to verify the validity of your certificate.
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Regenerating Self-Signed Certificates For a VMware ESXi Host

Introduction

I run a free VMware ESXi install on my Intel NUC at work. I mainly use this setup to deploy virtual machines for test and demo purposes. A self-signed certificate is by default available on VMware ESXi after installation.

I noticed that the FQDN of my host did not match the CN of the currently installed self-signed certificate (see the red markings on the figure below).

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How to Install a Free Public CA Certificate on a VMware ESXi Host

Introduction

I run a free VMware ESXi install on my Intel NUC at work. I mainly use this setup to run virtual machines for test and demo purposes. Up until now I used non-encrypted connections to the ESXi management console but I decided to use encrypted remote connections. Although a self signed certificate is by default available on the VMware ESXi install I wanted to use and install a new certificate that is signed by a valid public certificate authority.

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